Downtown Film Festival judges say hand me the envelope please…And the winner is…

14 07 2012
Downtown Film Festival L.A.Announces 2012 Award Winners

Betty I Am” and “We Are Legion” Given Best Picture NodsAnthony Meindl for “Birds Of A Feather” and Caskey Ebeling for “Getting Up”

Honored as Best Directors

Melissa Leo and Joey Capone Take TOP Acting Awards

Heathen and  Thieves” Captures Audience Favorite Award

The downtown Film Festival grows in the number of films entered and people attending each year. This is the first fest since it was in hiatus for two years and was held at the Independent theater with a dynamite afterparty at Towne (9th & Flower).

The winners of the 2012 Downtown Film Festival Los Angeles were announced today (Friday, July 13th) in an awards presentation at The Hayworth Theater in Los Angeles.

Taking top honors were “Betty I Am” and We Are Legion” for Best Picture feature narrative and  feature documentary, respectively. “Betty I Am” by director Jose Renteria Jr.is a stylish black-and-white film shot on 16 mm that follows the story of two siblings brought together by the untimely death of their father. “We Are Legion,” directed by Brian Knappenberger, is an in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at the secret hacktivist movement Anonymous.

Best Director honors went to Anthony Meindl for his narrative feature “Birds Of  A Feather”and to Caskey Ebeling for her documentary feature “Getting Up: The Tempt One Story.” Meindl’s film is a new twist on the time-honored comedic movie genre where the action revolves around the mounting of a musical play. Ebeling’s film is  a poignant account of the comeback of well-known graffiti artist Tempt One who became ill with ALS, the debilitating neurological affliction also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

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All four films – “Betty I Am,” “We Are Legion,” “Birds Of A Feather” and “Getting Up” made their  Los Angeles premieres during the festival.

“These independently produced feature films reflect the extraordinary quality and diversity of content in today’s independent cinema. We’re very proud to have played a role in providing a showcase for them in the Film Capital of the World,” said Greg Ptacek, Festival Co-Director.

Sharing the Best Picture Short Film award were “Been Good To Know Yuh” by director Corey Brandenstein, an imaginative depiction of a chapter in the life of poet-songwriter and folk singer Woody Guthrie,  and “This Is A Story About Ted and Alice” by director Teressa Tunney, a battle of the opposite sexes with a decidedly different ending.

The Audience Favorite award was captured by “Heathens and Thieves,” a genre-bending action thriller with a  film noir plotline of intrigue and betrayal but set in the Old West.

Oscar winner Melissa Leo took the Best Actress award for her dark comic role as a woman on the dating circuit in “This Is A Story About Ted And Alice.” Joey Capone was named “Best Actor” for his role in “Carlos Spills The Beans,” playing a character who inherits the family restaurant with disastrously funny consequences.

A complete list of the film awards, as they were presented at tonight’s Closing Night ceremony, follows. Downtown Film Festoval L.A. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to spotlighting emerging film talent in the culturally diverse and historic downtown district of Los Angeles.

Downtown Film Festival L.A. 2012 Film Awards

Note: Titles in ALL CAPS indicate feature-length films. Titles in “quotes” indicate short films.

1. Best Director – Short Film

Lauren Lillie – “Paying for It”

2. Best Editing – Short Film

Nayeli Garci-Crespo & Santi Minasi – “Dissent”

3. Best Screenwriting – Short Film

Paul Grellong – “Tracer Gun”

4. Best Cinematography – Short Film

Joe Kocsis – “Legend of the Widower Colby Wallace”

5. Best Musical Score – Short Film

Paul Festa – “The Glitter Emergency”

6. Best Short Films – Honorable Mention

  •  “The Glitter Emergency” directed by Paul Festa
  • “Past Due” directed by Denise C. Plumb
  • “Paying for It” directed by Lauren Lillie
  • “Scenen (Act 1, Scene 1)” directed by Hans Montelius
  • “Substance Ovüse”directed by Burke Roberts

7. Best Short Films (tie)

  •     “Been Good To Know Yuh” directed by Corey Brandenstein
  •     “This Is A Story About Ted and Alice” directed by Teressa Tunney

8. Best Los Angeles Films (All Films)

“Botes al Amanecer” directed by Nikki V. Roberts

9. Best Editing – Feature

Nils Arrington & Thom Newell – JUST LIKE BEING THERE

10.  Best Screenwriting – Feature

Iris Almaraz & Gustavo Ramos – DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR

11. Best Cinematography – Feature

Robert Murphy – CARLOS SPILLS THE BEANS

12.  Best Music/Score – Feature

Adam Blau – FUZZ TRACK CITY

13.  Best Performance by an Actor – Honorable Mention

  •     Michael Buffo – “Slapstick Porno”
  •     Robert Loggia – THE DIARY OF PRESTON PLUMMER
  •     Jimmy Simpson – “Tracer Gun”
  •     Rob Tepper – “Been Good to Know Yuh”

14. Best Performance by an Actor (All Roles/All Films)

Joey Capone – CARLOS SPILLS THE BEANS

15 . Best Performance by an Actress – Honorable Mention

  •     Anishika Fontae – “Gasp”
  •     Kelsey Ford – “Paying for It”
  •     Celeste Pechous – “Past Due”
  •     Matthew Simmons (playing Peg-Leg Ballerina) – “The Glitter Emergency”

16. Best Performance by an Actress (All Roles/All Films)

Melissa Leo – “This Is a Story About Ted and Alice”

17. Best Director – Feature Narrative

Anthony Meindl – BIRDS OF A FEATHER

18. Best Director – Feature Documentary

Caskey Ebeling – GETTING UP:  THE TEMPT ONE STORY

19. Audience Favorite Award (All Films)

HEATHENS AND THIEVES

Directed by Megan Peterson & John Douglas Sinclair

20. Best Picture – Documentary

WE ARE LEGION

Produced and Directed by Brian Knappenberger

21. Best Picture – Narrative

BETTY I AM

Produced by Joe Engelke, Israel Gomez

Directed by Jose Renteria Jr





Movie Publicists, Producers, and PR Pros Learn “How to Get Published” in Los Angeles Times

28 11 2010

Hollywood, CA – “She was a tough lady, but will always be remembered as one who was very protective of her clients as we should be,” said EPPS President Henri Bollinger, who had talked to the slain longtime Publicist Ronni Chasen the day before she was gunned down in Beverly Hill, Ca.

The Publicist was driving home on Sunset Blvd. from an after-party and the premiere of Cher’s new movie “Burlesque.”Detectives said they believed it was a deliberate hit, when they discovered the publicist in her black Mercedes sedan, which was wrapped around a light pole.  Chasen had suffered five gunshot wounds to the chest according to police.

“I was so traumatized that I realized that I was still only worried about an answer on a project, when a friend called and told me of her tragedy,” said Bollinger.

“It was then I realize that we need to live for the day, and you can not always be concerned over what you believe is important or a benefit to me. It took the better part of the day to reconcile,” he said.

Bollinger offered a moment of silence at the LA Times Entertainment Editors media workshop, immediately following his remarks at the ICG Local 600 Union Auditorium, Hollywood, CA. (Nov. 18, 2010).
Lisa Fung, LAT
The consensus in contacting editors or pitching a story and the best advice comes from Panelist Lisa Fung, Online Arts and Entertainment Editor, LA Times.
“Just forget that you have a phone, so email me your pitch and I will get back to you as soon as possible that’s the best way for me to get back to you. I just received 80 emails sitting here.”
Fung says social media brings tons of traffic to the LA Times website and blogs.
The last time I checked LAT Twitter had 93,000+ followers, too.
Online Arts and Entertainment Editor Lisa Fung says the best way to pitch everyone is by email.  During the meeting she noted that 80 emails had just come in, and she was deleting many in her inbox while
listening to other panelists.
She currently oversees round-the-clock multimedia coverage of all arts and entertainment, including Calendar. The Envelope, Company, Town and more than a dozen latimes.com blogs. To Reach her email: Lisa.Fung@latimes.com.
One of the pet peaves of editors is sending multiple email pitches, which could be the kiss of death. Randall Roberts reminded everyone about the email overload.
Randall Roberts, pop music editor, LA Times said,” he relies on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, etc where there are a lot of thoughtful people who share stories, trends and ideas.”
Randall Roberts, LA Times

 

Roberts also echoed earlier comments that social media drives traffic, and influences his decisions on story assignments. Often Robert says, he gets a lot of people who care about what he writes, and trend stories often pop up on Twitter and Facebook.

Roberts currently oversees all of the rock, pop, hip hop, electronic, world music, soundtrack and country coverage – basically everything except jazz and classical.
Before coming to the LA Times, Roberts served as music editor at LA Weekly. To reach him email is best at:Randal.Roberts@latimes.com.
Joy Press, Pop Culture & Deputy Television editor also told Entertainment Publicists to “keep your pitches short as “we are working on both print and Online versions of the Times.”
Pop Culture & Deputy Television Editor Joy Press also prefers email pitches from publicists. Press says they are always looking for good trend stories.

Press, before arriving at the Times, she was the culture editor at Salon.com, where she oversaw the entertainment, books and lifestyle sections and blogs.

She has written widely about TV, movies, music and all facets of popular culture.

(Joy.Press@latimes.com).

The Los Angeles Times Entertainment has several sections of the newspaper:  MOVIES TVMUSIC CELEBRITY ARTS & CULTURECOMPANY TOWN CALENDAR ENVELOPE BOOKS
Elena Howe, The Envelope Editor says she does not Tweet and does Faceboook “only with friends,” however she says “it will be her new goal to do it by the end of next year.”
Howe also says The Envelope does not take client photos or handouts, but rather relies heavily
on the wire image news services.
Howe chronicles the highs and lows of the Hollywood award season as the editor of The Envelope.
Elena Howe,
The Envelope Editor
She was previously an assistant editor for SoCal Living at the Times and has previously served as LIfestyle and news editor at several California publications. (Elena.Howe@latimes.com)
Howe also prefers email pitches on all stories.
The Envelope offers complete coverage of the Academy Awards, Oscar nominations, Golden Globes, Grammys, Emmys, red carpet fashion, news, celebrity gossip and more.
Be sure to check out the images of the event on FACEBOOK @http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=28363&id=152273848144795
and subscribe to this blog for future posts in your email. thx.
Sally Hofsmeiseter was the editor last year when The LA Times had The Envelope Launch kick-off party, October 2009.
The Winter and Summer EPPS mixer events are free to anyone interested.
Nikki Pesusich,
CFO, Coterie Public Relations
@EPPS LAT media workshop

Anyone reading this blog can contact us to learn more about EPPS and how to join, or be our guest at the next media workshop.

Nikki Pesusich, CFO, Coterie Public Relations @EPPS LAT media workshop, who won the EPPS door prize 2010 O’Dwyer PR directory (top 2,000 PR firms in USA) @ www.odwyerpr.com, Manhattan, NY.

Check out related stories and Related Content

For information about EPPS visit:www.eppsonline.org.
For entertainment publicity contact George Mc Quade
past president, EPPS, board member about this story.
or
Publicity@mayocommunications.com or call 818-340-5300.
Mc Quade is also the West Coast Bureau Chief
Google on insider tips on media and behind the
scenes of public relations and entertainment pubicity.

 





Social media adds powerful punch to movie marketing campaigns expert reveal

21 02 2010

[tweetmeme style=”compact”]

If you want to do social media you need to engage your target audience and treat them intelligently. That was the overriding message at a sold-out Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS) crowd at a media workshop on “How To Do Social Media.” It was sponsored by the International Cinematographers Union Local 600, Hollywood, CA.

Sandi Pannos, EPPS at the podium to kick off  Social Media Workshop at ICG Local 600  Auditorium, Hollywood this month.
(photos by                                                              George S. Mc Quade III – MAYO PR)

“It is possible to measure ROI,” but  according to Panelist Sally Falkow,  Expansion Plus, “Campaigns take four to six weeks of research and strategy and can cost from several thousand dollars to millions. “We don’t go by retainer, but more by the project, because it really depends upon how much time is involved and how long your project runs,” she said.

Falkow was joined by a handful of social media experts, who offered tips and resources on “How To Do Social Media.”

“Movie fans and visitors love behind the scenes marketing of movies,” said Vice President Wayne Bennett of MOVIESET (www.movieset.com), which is based in Vancouver, B.C. The free membership site helps market movies via images, on-the-set interviews and constant blogging. Bennet, a 20 year TV and movie production veteran, uses his social media skills to assist television production and publicity departments.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OrBQjyPlIA

“You have to type what’s going on behind the camera for fans all over the world,”  Bennett explained. “It might be the director of photography on how he lit the shot, or in the case of Peter Jackson in King Kong, before Facebook, YouTube and Twitter; he was literally posting photos of prop guys, costume fittings with actors, on the scene location scouts activities and video blogs. Jackson built this buzz that topped a million fans, who were already engaged in the process and the movie by the time he finished it for distribution.”

Wayne Bennett

The panel also briefly talked about Widgets, which can be placed on a site or blog, allowing interaction with the visitor without leaving the site. For example:  the Red Cross might have a widget on a blog, where you can donate directly to Haiti earthquake victims.

Panelists also recommended the funneling all your social media sites such as Facebook, Myspace, LinkedIn, Twitter on one portal such as http://www.tweetdeck.com, where you can organize your feeds and tweets.

“Nonprofit organizations do not tell there story very well,” said President Larry Eason, DotOrgpower, Los Angeles.  The digital strategy and communications firm helps dot orgs harness the web and new media to achieve their goals. He works with cause leaders to expand their sense of what is possible Online. He claims to be an evangelist for the power of Online story-telling to move the public, donors and influentials. “You need to treat your audiences intelligently when telling your stories,” explained Eason.

Eason pioneered the use of new media for the Public Interest Research Groups (PIRGs) starting a first-of-its-kind in-house media center, which was acquired by Virilion where he worked with cause and corporate clients such as eBay and Georgetown University.

“You need to target your community groups, mobile interaction, action platforms, and set your goal,” said Mac McLean, Click Communications, North Hollywood, CA. “Before forming Click Communications in May, 2007, McLean handled theatrical promotions, worked at a national advertising agency and did publicity for major studios.

Some panelists noted that 60 percent of the marketing campaigns are spent on social media strategy versus 40 percent on PR and Marketing. “It is one more layer of client management, but for a restaurant the goal is to get people in the door,” said Caroline Rustigian Bruderer, CEO of K-LINE 7 Co., Orange County.

While everyone thought the best way to market your   film is social networking and the best marketing tool   is Facebook with more than 400 million users other tactics surface.

EPPS Media workshop

“Every movie or TV project has a core audience, and   the Internet is the most strategic way to get to those   people,” explained MOVIESET’S Bennett. “This    allows you to do the EPK and other advertising much   later. The concept is Production is the new    Promotion, and the sooner you engage your audience the sooner they are going to grab onto it, and follow the different phases to the point where you get to your last news release or airing. There will be much more information that surfaces to the top of Google than there would be in putting out a short release over six weeks.”

Entertainment companies and filmmakers are leveraging the power of social media by marketing their films to international audiences and building loyal audiences and communities around their work.

Another tactic mentioned are RSS feeds, which in layman’s terms stands for real simple syndication or officially “rich site summary for delivering regularly changing web content. All agreed that to increase web traffic PR pros need an RSS feed on their client’s website or blog to whoever subscribes or wants the content.